Menu

Subscribe To The Booster Today!

Texas Home Exteriors

‘The Only Flying Outhouse In The World’

Editors Note: This is an excerpt from a much longer story that ran recently in one of Polk County Publishing Companies other newspaper, The Polk County Enterprise. The original story was about Outhouses in Polk County, and included this interesting story about the famous Outhouse Liftoff that Clyde Gray "engineered" out at Heritage Village. Clyde, in addition to being an incredible artist, was a great "promoter." The great outhouse liftoff had to be his biggest success. Heritage Village in Woodville was packed the day of the liftoff with local, area and state visitors, including numerous celebrates. I know this because a 40 year younger version of myself was there shooting photos that day. I shot the top large photos, left and right, in the monument Clyde Gray stand behind in the photo. Last time I checked, a version of the monument with the tiles still stood out at the Village.

by Beverly Miller

Now I saved my best for last — "The Only Flying Outhouse in the World." This story began many years ago, when I was eating lunch at the Pickett House and Heritage Village Museum in Woodville. As I was waiting to be seated, I noticed a newspaper article that was displayed on the bulletin board at the Pickett House. Enjoy this bit of outhouse history! The article reads like this...

Artist and Serial Entrepreneur Clyde Gray stands at Heritage Village next to a monument preserving the day an outhouse took wing in Tyler County. Your (much younger) editor shot the top left and right photos on the monument in 1976.Artist and Serial Entrepreneur Clyde Gray stands at Heritage Village next to a monument preserving the day an outhouse took wing in Tyler County. Your (much younger) editor shot the top left and right photos on the monument in 1976."The following is as it is remembered by the writings of Jack Whitmeyer.

"The time: early in the year 1976. America is getting ready to celebrate its birthday. The Cajuns of Nederland, and Port Neches are getting ready to dedicate their new museum, 'The Maison d' Acadian,' which they had built close to the Dutch Heritage Society's Windmill at Nederland.

"The scene: Clyde Gray's art studio at Heritage Village.

"The cast of characters: Clyde Gray, three or four of the movers and shakers from the Nederland group, among them was the man who billed himself as the "Crazy Frenchman," A.J. Judice, a gentleman who was playing George Washington down there.
"The discussion: 'The group from Nederland had come up to talk to Clyde about finding them an authentic outhouse which they could obtain. They wished to use it on a float in a parade to advertise the Cajun Museum and to be placed in the back yard at the museum. If Clyde could find them one, they would get a truck and come up to get it and haul it down. Well, Clyde, always the promoter, said he had an outhouse next to the Tolar Cabin at the Heritage Village, which he might be interested in donating, if its point of origin was displayed on it. This was agreeable to everyone, when the other promoter, which was me, spoke up: You fellows might get a little radio coverage out of this, maybe a local TV, why not go for broke. This is America's Bicentennial and the space age is just starting up: why, I just saw in the paper that NASA has appointed a sanitation engineer to work on the new space shuttle. Now, you fellows have connections with the offshore industry and they use helicopters to fly all kinds of heavy loads out to the rigs. Talk one of them into coming up here and flying the outhouse down and placing it on site, that ought to get you some good coverage, (it ended up going worldwide). Well, Clyde jumped on it like a rooster on a bug and the others went along. From here the thing snowballed! Clyde got hold of the man from NASA, yes he would work with us. George Washington came up and certified that, yes it was an outhouse. We put it on a pallet, wrapped it with chicken wire to keep it together, tied it down to the pallet, and put an eyebolt at each corner to lift it with. The sanitation engineer came over from NASA and certified that it was ready to fly. A young musician wrote a song about the flying outhouse and recorded it. He had tapes for sale. Clyde had me print thousands of copies of James Whitcomb Riley's poem, "The Passing of the Outhouse," which he sold for years."

The article continues..."The big day arrived. We had a large crowd; TV cameras all over the place. All the dignitaries gathered on the porch, Clyde introduced them, the sanitation engineer made a speech, Washington waved to the crowd, the musicians sang his song. In the meantime, Jethro Holmes arrived with Tom and Jerry, his ox team; they were hitched to the outhouse and pulled it out to the side of the highway. We attached the slings and made the outhouse ready to be flown to its new destination. The Highway Patrol stopped traffic and right on schedule, here came the helicopter. It was positioned overhead, the cable was dropped, we hooked up the slings, and off it went. There was a car waiting. Clyde, myself and several others jumped in and headed south to get to the destination so we could unhook the outhouse. Well, the wind was strong aloft and the chopper pilot was having trouble controlling his flight so he set down at Kountze and from there got a truck and trailer, loaded the outhouse up and headed to the Jefferson County airport. There, the chopper picked the outhouse again and delivered it on schedule to the Museum at Nederland. National TV picked up the story and ran it that night. By the next day, it was being aired worldwide. For several years we had tourists from all around the world coming in wanting to see where the outhouse had been flown from. Some couldn't speak much English, but they could say "outhouse" and point up."

In a personal interview with Fred Sullivan of Sullivan's Hardware Store in Woodville, Fred told me this story. He said, "My wife and children were returning from Nederland and we saw the trailer, loaded with the outhouse, approaching and the children said, 'look there's the outhouse! Well, the TV cameras didn't catch the outhouse coming down the highway...just the landing of the outhouse, delivered by the helicopter."

Ham Radio Field Day connects county to world

Tyler County Amateur Radio Association held its first Field Day on Saturday, June 27, at the Tyler County Emergency Operations Center in Woodville. In the photo, mostly from left to right, are Tina Cleberg and daughter Victoria, Bruce Womack, Barbara Petri, TCARA Vice President Chuck Petri, Billie Yancy and her two granddaughters, Mia and Tatum Miller, EOC Emergency Coordinator Dale Freeman (back), James Wedgeworth and son Joseph, Johnnie and Earnest Matlock, U.S. Rep. Dr. Brian Babin, Floyd Petri, Jeremy Swan, Marc Holcomb, Jim Beattie, ARRL Emergency Coordinator Nick Toparcean and Tyler County Judge and Emergency Director Jacques Blanchette. See WD5TYL.org for all the members.  (Jim Powers Photo)Tyler County Amateur Radio Association held its first Field Day on Saturday, June 27, at the Tyler County Emergency Operations Center in Woodville. In the photo, mostly from left to right, are Tina Cleberg and daughter Victoria, Bruce Womack, Barbara Petri, TCARA Vice President Chuck Petri, Billie Yancy and her two granddaughters, Mia and Tatum Miller, EOC Emergency Coordinator Dale Freeman (back), James Wedgeworth and son Joseph, Johnnie and Earnest Matlock, U.S. Rep. Dr. Brian Babin, Floyd Petri, Jeremy Swan, Marc Holcomb, Jim Beattie, ARRL Emergency Coordinator Nick Toparcean and Tyler County Judge and Emergency Director Jacques Blanchette. See WD5TYL.org for all the members. (Jim Powers Photo)

by Michael G. Maness

At precisely 1 p.m., Saturday, June 27, Tyler County connected with the world for its first Field Day as a group of ham radio enthusiasts gathered at the county Emergency Op Center in the Nutrition Center in Woodville.

Easy—use a fishing pole to throw a line over a tree, pull the 160-meter wire antenna over, and in ten minutes you are on the air. All for about $10! Nick Toparcean borrowed some black nylon trout line to anchor the antennae to the EOC window, strung the lead inside, and hooked it to the EOC ham radio. After a few adjustments, Toparcean had the capability to talk to the other side of the earth and—hold your breath—even to the International Space Station. Wow!

Talk about bouncing signals off the moon ... connecting to repeaters scattered from Galveston to southern Oklahoma ... Tyler County was a critical component for completing the last link to this chain of repeaters.

The Tyler County Amateur Radio Association began about two and a half years ago. V.P. Chuck Petri maintains the website, WD5TYL.org, and was the leader this day, as President Charles Zimmerman had to attend a funeral.

The repeater call sign and the club call sign are the same: WD5TYL. The TCARA requested this call sign from the FCC, which was granted just a few months ago. The repeater is located in Doucette and maintained by the TCARA. A repeater "repeats" or takes a weak signal and amplifies it in order to increase the distance of the signal, often called the radio horizon or footprint. Chuck's father, Floyd Petri, maintains a private repeater in Chester.

The permission to install the Doucette repeater was secured by John Stagg and Brian Cater from the commissioner's court in 2010, though several attempts to install a repeater failed. The TCARA partnered with the county EOC and successfully installed the current repeater.

"Amateur" radio does not mean "beginner or novice," rather it refers to all those not in formal military, marine, aviation or police radio communications.

There are three levels of licensed radio operators, entry-level Technician, mid-level General and the top Extra Class license.

The FCC extends operating privileges commensurate with each class, to help insure that operators understand the laws and operate safely.

Toparcean said, "Radio frequencies at the levels we use can be dangerous. Radio waves are radiation. Or one can damage expensive equipment if one overpowers or improperly tunes a transmitter." He illustrated with a water pipe. The goal is for water to flow smoothly. But if a pipe gets choked, it constricts the water, and that is when problems can happen. The same applies to a radio signal. Just as you would want water to flow through a pipe with no leaks or restrictions, you want the radio signal to exit the antenna properly and as efficiently as possible.

The sophistication of the radio community might intimidate a novice, but there was an encouraging environment with plenty of resources. Very family friendly—this gathering had several husbands and wives, fathers and sons, and mothers and daughters.

There were six radios up and running: Earnest and Johnnie Matlock had one; Floyd Petri, one; his son Chuck Petri, two; Nick Toparcean ran the EOC one; Bruce Womack, one (who also does the fantastic computer-controlled Christmas light display each year).

James Wedgeworth's eleven-year-old son, Joseph, was there and ready to take his technician's test. Several have been working on and off with radios for decades, like Floyd Petri since in 1957, but just got their first license in the last few years.

They are growing fast.

Tina Cleberg's daughter, Victoria, was practicing her code on the Morris Code training machine. The machine registered each dot or dash and confirmed when a proper letter was communicated. Victoria was gaining expertise as she composed whole words, next will be full sentences, and mom has promised to get Victoria her own machine.

In addition to a load of literature available for visitors, each station had a large poster of the available bands, color coded, with several of the primary frequency ranges. Each band was designated by meters, especially the high frequency bands, as in "10 meters" and "40 meters." That refers to the length of the antennae, and the bands can go all the way up to the "160 meters."

U.S. Rep. Dr. Brian Babin dropped by for this historic event in Tyler County, giving his hearty support for this crucial piece of emergency infrastructure, and reflected on how his father had used ham radios during WWII.

Tyler County Booster Editor Jim Powers has been a ham operator for 54-plus years and related a frightening encounter in Nov. of 1978. While taking traffic from Guyana, someone needed a phone patch. Before long, Powers was relaying patches all over the U.S. A kook named Jim Jones had ordered his "Red Brigade" to shoot "defectors" at the Port Kaituma Airstrip, killing five, including U.S. Rep. Leo Ryan. Later that day, as news leaked out, Jones had led 909 followers with 304 children to drink cyanide laced Kool-Aid.

Ham radios allow communication during complete black outs. Even if the police bands fail, these radios can be up and running in minutes.

The American Radio Relay League, est. in 1914, hosts ARRL Field Day every year for a 27-hour marathon of national communication that crosses the globe. The goal is "To work as many stations as possible on any and all amateur bands ... and to learn to operate in abnormal situations" (see ARRL.org). Always on the fourth Saturday in June at precisely 1800 or 6 p.m. Zulu or Greenwich Mean Time, which is set at the Prime Meridian in Greenwich, England—in Woodville it was 1 p.m. because of daylight savings. Though points are accumulated for a variety types of connections logged, there are no awards given. Meant to be less competitive and more collaborative—this is serious fun.

The ARRL is the largest national association for amateur or "ham" radio operators in the U.S. with over 160k members. Field Day is education, practice and PR. They are a part of the International Amateur Radio Union which is organized in three regions: Region 2 has about 830k stations in the Americas, Region 3 about 750k in Asia and the Pacific Ocean, and Region 1 about 400k in Europe, Middle East, and Africa. There are about 3 million operators worldwide.

At the end of the day, Tyler County had communicated with hundreds across the nation. Chuck Petri said, "The farthest contact made during Field Day was by my mother, Barbara Petri, working digital on 20 meters. She contacted the US Navy Hospital Ship USNS Mercy off the coast of Bougainville Island in Papua, New Guinea.

The TCARA meets every first Thursday at 7 p.m. at 201 Veteran's Way in Woodville, Texas. Visitors are welcome. Please see WD5TYL.org.

Tyler County Amateur Radio Field Day

Amateur Radio Field Day

Tyler County Amateur Radio Association held its first Field Day on Saturday, June 27, at the Tyler County Emergency Operations Center in Woodville. Ham radio operators have been holding these events for years in preparation for emergencies when their ability to communicate is invaluable. Look for a full-length feature about Saturday's Field Day by Michael Maness in next week's Tyler County Booster. (Jim Powers Photo)

Colmesneil FFA student officers host banquet

Colmesneil FFA student officers hosted a parent-member banquet for the incoming officers, parents, teachers and administration Tuesday evening May 19 to a full room. In the photo are the year’s outgoing and incoming officers (L-R), Ag. Teacher Katie Martin, Superintendent Angela Matterson, Blaine Turner, Morganne Ross, Diana Montgomery, Mallory Monk, Jake Pattillo, Shelby Tally, Andrew Harmon, Sarah Davis, MvKenzie Rogers, Hunter Rawls (top), Alicyn Mitcham (bottom), Ag. Teacher Matt Swinney, Kameron Lindsey and HS Principal Walter McAlpin. Colmesneil FFA student officers hosted a parent-member banquet for the incoming officers, parents, teachers and administration Tuesday evening May 19 to a full room. In the photo are the year’s outgoing and incoming officers (L-R), Ag. Teacher Katie Martin, Superintendent Angela Matterson, Blaine Turner, Morganne Ross, Diana Montgomery, Mallory Monk, Jake Pattillo, Shelby Tally, Andrew Harmon, Sarah Davis, MvKenzie Rogers, Hunter Rawls (top), Alicyn Mitcham (bottom), Ag. Teacher Matt Swinney, Kameron Lindsey and HS Principal Walter McAlpin.

by Michael G. Maness

Colmesneil Future Farmers of America student officers organized and hosted a barbeque for the incoming officers, parents, teachers and administration Tuesday evening May 19 to a full room, preempting the normal ISD board meeting which will take place the following week.

Decorated according to FFA colors and themes, the current student officers sat at the head table, distinguished in their blue jackets with yellow FFA patch.

Cullen Reeves gave the welcome and Andrew Harmon the invocation.

After the meal, the officers proceeded to open what appeared to be a formal FFA meeting, with gavel and each officer reciting the duties of his or her office, all with the highest honor and respect to each other.

Erin Seamans introduced the guests. Surprise—Superintendent Angela Matterson and HS Principal Walter McAlpin were invited forward to receive a special jacket for all of their support.

Jake Patillo, over 6 foot tall, gave Matterson her jacket, smiling, and saying, "We did not have an extra small." Some good laughs and Matterson gave a special thanks for the Ag. Teacher and his class for their above-the-call-of-duty work on Lake Tejas.

Hunter Rawls presented the 2014-15 FFA Sweetheart award to Mallory Monk, saying, "This young woman is chosen to represent her fellow members as the sweetest, cutest, best all-around girl. She is always good for a laugh, a hug, or just someone to talk to."

The FFA is a national organization helping to instill leadership skills into all student members going into any vocation, not just agriculture (FFA.org).

As the officers proceeded to present a host of awards, the room filled with pride as the accomplishments of student after student were read by the student FFA officer. The peer affirmation and respect fostered a contagious esprit de corp.

The conducting team took fifth place at district, even though they had to play some catch up on learning parliamentary procedures in field where most of the other schools had been competing for years.

Senior creed speaker was Shelby Tally, a junior and current president of FFA, placing third at district. The public relations team of Andrew Harmon, Erin Seamans and Morgan Ross placed fourth with their presentation on the basics of the FFA.
Lindsey Dobbins presented at district as green hand creed speaker.

Cole Johnson and Taylor Barker then presented honorary chapter FFA degrees to parent Mark Pattilo who headed up the barbeque. He came to almost all of the FFA activities and has helped cook numerous times. Honorary chapter degrees were presented to Bert Theadford for his support of the agriculture mechanic projects for show and general career guidance and to Rick Bailey for his support of multiple projects.

Last but not least, the students beamed as they presented jackets to their agriculture teachers Matt Sweeney and Katie Mouton. A couple stories of their patience were shared as their fun in travels to the many functions throughout their year.
Many more awards were presented with crafty and often endearing vignettes of what each student had worked through and accomplished.

The leadership teams placed accordingly. Senior conducting won fourth in district with Treasure Jackson, Jack Patillo, Same Matterson, Meagan Cheney, Presley Parker, Richard Barnes, Nikki Rogers, Hunter Rawls and Zach Bryan. Public relations took fourth with Mallory Monk Andrew Harmon and Erin Seamans. Radio took fourth with Haleigh Belt, Morganne Ross and McKenzie Rogers.

The judging teams did well too. Floriculture took third in the district and seventh in the area with Bailey Davis, Alicyn Mitcham, Brittiny Giesey and Haleigh Belt.

Nursery landscape took second in district, fourth in area and became a state qualifier with Diana Montgomery, Morganne Ross, Andrew Harmon and McKenzie Rogers.

Poultry judging took second in district, fourth in area and became a state qualifier with Mallor Monk, Shelby Tally and Sarah Davis.

Ag mechanics were the Houston Livestock Blue Ribbon qualifiers with Jack Patillo, Eli Dinger, Chris Thedford and Randal Patrick.

Livestock judging took top five YMBL, third in district, seventh in area and became a state qualifier with Erin Seamans, Jack Pattillo and Taylor Barker.

Wildlife judging took second in the country, second in district, fifth in regionals and became a state qualifier with Chris Thedford, Jake Pattillo, Taylor Barker and Eli Dinger.

In show, about 50 students has presented in everything from broilers and bulls, goats and swine, steers and rabbits, to breeding heifers and Erin Lusk's commercial heifer that took grand champion.

Among the many testimonies of gratitude to the FFA and Colmesneil ISD, Morganne Ross presented one award and then lit up and shared how she never thought she would stand before people and speak.

At the end, the lights were dimmed and the current FFA officers lined up on the left and lit their candles. The incoming officers lined up on the right. As each current officer approached the incoming officer, the current officer would ask if the incoming was ready to assume the listed duties of his or her auspicious office. Upon concurrence, the outgoing officer would light the candle of the incoming, turn, put out his light, and return the end of his line.

After all the lights were passed, the new officers took their seats at the head of the table and adjourned the meeting. School official thankful and parents beaming with pride.

Rep. Babin keynotes Kirby High School reunion

Rep. Dr. Brian Babin keynoted the auspicious Kirby HS reunion Saturday, noon, May 2, to a full room of over 250 in the Woodville ISD elementary cafeteria. On platform are (L-R) Béla Nagypal, Mary Alice Nagypal, Babin, Fred Sullivan, Sybil Mitchell, and Bertis W. Best.Rep. Dr. Brian Babin keynoted the auspicious Kirby HS reunion Saturday, noon, May 2, to a full room of over 250 in the Woodville ISD elementary cafeteria. On platform are (L-R) Béla Nagypal, Mary Alice Nagypal, Babin, Fred Sullivan, Sybil Mitchell, and Bertis W. Best.

by Michael G. Maness

Rep. Dr. Brian Babin, U.S. Dist. 36, keynoted the auspicious Kirby HS reunion Saturday, noon, May 2, to a full room of over 250 in the Woodville ISD elementary cafeteria.

Perhaps unique in the nation, to be an official guest one has to have been fifty years out of high school to get the first invitation. A patriotic theme set the tone with flags everywhere. The program had a shield inscribed with the words "Home of the Free, Because of the Brave" encircling an eagle. An M-16 rifle protruded up from a combat boot, topped with a combat helmet and dog tags.

All sung the national anthem and pledged allegiance to the U.S. flag. All veterans were recognized. A prayer was said for the meal, a scrumptious entre of chicken cordon bleu on rice pilaf, with seasoned veggies, strawberry shortcake and more.

Mary Alice Nagypal introduced her friend, and friend of so many, Rep. Dr. Babin, well-known Woodville dentist who was recently elected to Texas District 36 of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Babin expressed his thanks, recalling how he was the first representative elected from Tyler County since Samuel Bronson Cooper in 1892. Babin was proud that he had lived in Southeast Texas all of his life.

"Love it here," he said with gusto. He bragged on his substantial family, fond that several children had come back to Woodville to live. His oldest son, Leif, recently had a son. Babin noted, "Unfortunately" Leif has "got to live in Manhattan, New York City. He wants to get back to east Texas in a bad way." A round of applause appreciated that.
"I want to say how proud I am to be a native of this wonderful town and ... county," said Babin. "There's nothing closer to being the epitome of being an American than being someone from a small town. And I am so thankful we were able to raise every one of our children right here."

Babin reflected upon his move to Tyler County in 1979, and he became mayor in two years later. He pointed out Walt Davis, who was Woodville's city manager back then. Babin reflected how after Hurricane Katrina there was so much hollering about what the government did and did not do in Louisiana. Then several days later, Hurricane Rita came, a storm just as bad. "We weren't screaming and raising our hands," he said, "we were holding hands. We got together and we worked. We helped each other. We had each other's back. That's what makes me proud to be an East Texan, and I've been one all my life."

Looking out over the crowd, Babin noted how he has known many for the last 35 years, and he thanked them for their patriotism, which was followed with another round of applause.

Babin reflected on his time in the military and his activism in the Republican Party in East Texas, which was new to the solidly Democratic Tyler County then. Having served in the military under Jimmy Carter, and watching so much of Carter "wringing his hands," it was too much for Babin, so he decided to help Reagan.

There were perhaps three known Republicans. Babin tactfully called his organization "Conservative Voters of Tyler County," and landed Michael Reagan to speak in the ballroom of the Woodville Inn, which would fill with Democrats. Ronald Reagan took Tyler County by a very large margin, and took nearly every other county in Southeast Texas in 1980.

Having practiced dentistry for 35 years, Babin quipped, "I only took Tyler County by 87 percent, and perhaps I did not give enough deadening to the others."

"You're probably wondering, 'Why do we need a dentist up there in D.C.?' ... because we know how to get to the root of a problem. And sometimes you have to take a tooth out." More laughter and applause.
Babin thanked Mary Alice, Fred Sullivan, Sybil Mitchel and Bertis Best who were on the platform with him and then took a few questions.

First was, "What are the plans to put a good man in the White House?" To which Babin said he was impressed with most of the Republicans running.

"Each year," Babin said with definition in his voice, "I keep hearing, 'This is the most important election of our life time.' But you know what? It gets more and more serious with each cycle. I think this IS the most important election of our lifetime ... this 2016 election." Babin emphasized, "We've got a lot of problems in this country. We have an open uncontrolled southern border.... We need to make sure we get a handle on that southern border.... I was briefed on this just a couple of days ago. We've got some bad folks coming across that border.... That's another reason ... our military continues to be second to none, the best in the world! We're working extremely hard to make sure that happens." Another big round of applause with a few "Amens."

Cecile Lazenby, whose son was there and a Vietnam veteran, asked Babin if he was in Vietnam.

"I was not," Babin replied. "I was sent to Germany." He thanked her son for his service. Reflecting on his son, Babin noted that Leif had commanded Navy SEALs in Afghanistan, including famed SEAL Chris Kyle who wrote the best seller American Sniper.

Fred Sullivan returned to the podium, thankful for his recent recovery from a five-by-pass heart surgery, the result of preparations for a knee surgery. Always helping in these reunions, he fondly recalled several stories of days gone by. He felt this unique, because, "You have to be about 68 years old to get your first invitation." Laughter rippled through, subdued and somber. And one gets an invitation forever after.

Sullivan recalled how the first Kirby school was built with $30,000 donated by lumberman John Henry Kirby in 1928 and burned down in August of 1943. Most of them there had attended the second Kirby HS which was built on the foundations of the first.

Sullivan highlighted a large book put together by Mary Ferguson Neal on the history of the school.

Two were present that graduated from Kirby HS before 1940. Ms. Mildred Parker graduated in 1936 and was nearing her 99th birthday, and Jesse Lazenby graduated in the class of 1938.

Their reunion tradition was to celebrate the class of each decade of the class being recognized, this year being 1965. No one was there from 1945, so Sullivan gave a short recap. For 1955, John Allen Evans gave a history.

These cultural vignettes and date-stamped data helped recall the unique cultures of those decades.

This year, the new honored guests were the class of 1965, noted as the largest class to have graduated from Kirby HS with 75 – 52 still living – and as remarkable were the 30 present at their distinguished table. The '65 class representative was George Jarrott, who gave a short recap of the '60s and "their" time together.

When asked about her role as "class agent" to track her class, Beverly Sue Shaw gibed, "Bunch of heathens," and laughed a bit, joking, with love and affection bubbling as she recalled their senior class trip and much more.

Sybil Mitchell gave a scholarship of $1,000 to Vicki Sheffield, a middle school English teacher working on her doctoral dissertation. Mitchell instilled that this scholarship was from the students of famed English teacher Francis "Ab" Abernethy's four classes of 1952, '53, '54 and '55. Such was their affection for that teacher, that Mitchell and Mary Lee attended Abernathy's memorial service in April 2015 at Banita Creek Hall in Nacogdoches. He cared for his students and kept in touch with many decades after he left, and the students have not forgotten to this day. Three years ago, his donations have secured a sound system that is used exclusively for this reunion and kept at Mary Lee's home, who herself has been one of the reunion's "go to" persons and social grappler.

Musician Walter Plant played for two-hour social time before the meal, and though blind, one would hardly know, given his huge repertoire of classic hit songs.

Food was prepared by the Woodville Food Service Association, an affiliate of the Texas School Food Service Association, led by Linda Johnson, the WFSA president. Their crew donated their time. All profits from this go the WFSA's fund for Woodville HS scholarships. They give $4,000 in scholarships every year, and to date they have given over $80,000 to help Woodville graduates in their college pursuits.

Unlike any big city school, even impossible there, from start to finish this remarkably unique reunion was built from a precious fellowship of former students over many decades of devotion to their school and precious memories.

Indeed, as Congressman Babin noted and all present there that day affirmed – and outsiders envy – "There's nothing closer to being the epitome of being an American than being someone from a small town."

Ivanhoe residents kick off ‘Ivanhoe Pride Campaign’ with Clean Up Day

IvanhoePrideCleanUp

Residents of Ivanhoe came together Saturday to kick off the Ivanhoe Pride Campaign with a Clean-Up Day.

Approximately 50 folks, including children ages 2-17, went out to the streets to pick up trash, right-of-ways were mowed, signage was installed indicating the fines that could be levied for littering and dumping and finally the group came together to celebrate their endeavors with lunch served at their Community Center.

Ivanhoe joined a county-wide endeavor to stop littering in Tyler County headed up by Emergency Management Coordinator and Ivanhoe resident, Dale Freeman.

Sheriff Brian Weatherford and Justice of the Peace Trisher Ford have declared their support in enforcing Texas State law governing littering.

City officials along with Association Directors and all of the various civic organizations joined forces in the community-wide effort and want to ask everyone's support in keeping the community clean.

State Law Will Be Enforced In Ivanhoe!